Cakes and Frostings

Cakes and Frostings

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Cakes and Frostings Cakes and Frostings This all-American dessert may be one of the most enduring images in the world of desserts. So, to satisfy everyone’s sweet cravings, we offer cakes for every appetite and every occasion: gingerbread for the holidays, luscious cheesecakes for parties, tempting butter cakes for family suppers, and some of the most delectable chocolate cakes ever.
Cakes and Frostings

Cakes and Frostings

This all-American dessert may be one of the most enduring images in the world of desserts. So, to satisfy everyone’s sweet cravings, we offer cakes for every appetite and every occasion: gingerbread for the holidays, luscious cheesecakes for parties, tempting butter cakes for family suppers, and some of the most delectable chocolate cakes ever.

PERFECT CAKES EVERY TIME

The ingredients in cake recipes are carefully balanced, so it is essential that you precisely measure the ingredients and make sure that they are at room-temperature. Butter You can usually use either butter or stick margarine, but butter has superior flavor. Soften the butter just until malleable. Eggs We use large eggs to make our cakes. Chilled eggs don’t beat to their maximum volume, so leave them out at room temperature after separating them. Flour Although most of our recipes call for all-purpose flour, some use cake flour, which produces tender cakes. If you don’t have cake flour, for every cup of cake flour, spoon 2 tablespoons of cornstarch into a 1-cup measure. Spoon in enough all-purpose flour to fill the cup, then level it off. When measuring flour, use the spoon-and-sweep method (see Basics). Pans Always use the recommended pan size. Measure the pan if necessary. To line a pan, place it on a piece of waxed paper. Use a pencil to trace around the bottom edge and cut out the shape. Greasing and Flouring If the recipe directs you, grease or grease and flour the pans. (Pans for foam cakes are not greased because these batters need to cling to the side of the pan as they rise.) Apply a film of vegetable shortening using a folded piece of paper towel. When greasing a Bundt pan, be sure to get into all the crevices, or use nonstick cooking spray. To flour a greased pan, sprinkle a tablespoon or so of flour into the pan, tilting it to coat the bottom and side. Invert the pan and tap out the excess. Cakes and Frostings step-by-step

Oven Know-How

Position the oven racks as directed, then thoroughly preheat the oven. When baking two cakes, place a rack in the center of the oven. If baking more cakes, place the racks in the center and upper third of the oven. Stagger the pans so they are not directly above one another. Cake pans should never touch the sides of the oven or each other. For cakes baked in tube pans, position the oven rack in the lower third of the oven.

STORING CAKES

Always refrigerate cakes that contain fillings or frostings made with whipped cream, cream cheese, sour cream, yogurt, or eggs. Because of their high fat content, unfrosted butter cakes stay moist for two or three days at room temperature. Foam cakes contain little or no fat and dry out quickly; store at room temperature for up to two days. To freeze butter cakes, place them, unwrapped, in the freezer until firm; wrap in plastic and then in heavy-duty foil. Frosted cakes can be frozen for up to two months; unfrosted cakes for up to six months. Do not freeze cakes with whipped-cream frostings or egg-based fillings. Foam cakes can be frozen in heavy-duty zip-tight plastic bags for up to three months.

BUTTER CAKES

These cakes rely on fat for moistness and richness. The fat must be beaten well with the sugar to provide an aerated base. Beat the butter-and-sugar mixture with an electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy, scraping down the side of the bowl as directed. Beat in the eggs, one a time, beating well after each addition. Pour the batter into the prepared pans and gently tap the pans on a counter to break any large air bubbles. The cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Some cakes also pull away slightly from the side of the pan. Or lightly press the center of the cake with your finger; the top should spring back. Cool the cake on a wire rack for ten minutes. Run a knife around the inside of the pan. Invert a second rack on top of the pan. Invert both racks along with the pan. Remove the top rack and the cake pan. Replace the top rack and invert the cake again, so it is right side up. butter cakes, cake icing, cake icing recipe, cakes frostings, cupcake decorations, cupcake icing, cupcake recipes, cupcakes recipes, frosting, icing on the cake, oven know-how, perfect cakes every time, storing cakes, recipes, snack recipes, drink recipes, cake recipes, condiment, nutrition, tips and tricks, asian recipes, american recipes, european recipes, african recipes, australie recipes, Indonesian recipes
Thursday, 23 November 2017

Cakes and Frostings

Article Categories : Cakes & Frostings

Cakes and Frostings

Cakes and Frostings

This all-American dessert may be one of the most enduring images in the world of desserts. So, to satisfy everyone’s sweet cravings, we offer cakes for every appetite and every occasion: gingerbread for the holidays, luscious cheesecakes for parties, tempting butter cakes for family suppers, and some of the most delectable chocolate cakes ever.

PERFECT CAKES EVERY TIME

The ingredients in cake recipes are carefully balanced, so it is essential that you precisely measure the ingredients and make sure that they are at room-temperature.

Butter You can usually use either butter or stick margarine, but butter has superior flavor. Soften the butter just until malleable.

Eggs We use large eggs to make our cakes. Chilled eggs don’t beat to their maximum volume, so leave them out at room temperature after separating them.

Flour Although most of our recipes call for all-purpose flour, some use cake flour, which produces tender cakes. If you don’t have cake flour, for every cup of cake flour, spoon 2 tablespoons of cornstarch into a 1-cup measure. Spoon in enough all-purpose flour to fill the cup, then level it off. When measuring flour, use the spoon-and-sweep method (see Basics).

Pans Always use the recommended pan size. Measure the pan if necessary. To line a pan, place it on a piece of waxed paper. Use a pencil to trace around the bottom edge and cut out the shape.

Greasing and Flouring If the recipe directs you, grease or grease and flour the pans. (Pans for foam cakes are not greased because these batters need to cling to the side of the pan as they rise.) Apply a film of vegetable shortening using a folded piece of paper towel. When greasing a Bundt pan, be sure to get into all the crevices, or use nonstick cooking spray. To flour a greased pan, sprinkle a tablespoon or so of flour into the pan, tilting it to coat the bottom and side. Invert the pan and tap out the excess.

Cakes and Frostings step-by-step

Oven Know-How

Position the oven racks as directed, then thoroughly preheat the oven. When baking two cakes, place a rack in the center of the oven. If baking more cakes, place the racks in the center and upper third of the oven. Stagger the pans so they are not directly above one another. Cake pans should never touch the sides of the oven or each other. For cakes baked in tube pans, position the oven rack in the lower third of the oven.

STORING CAKES

Always refrigerate cakes that contain fillings or frostings made with whipped cream, cream cheese, sour cream, yogurt, or eggs. Because of their high fat content, unfrosted butter cakes stay moist for two or three days at room temperature. Foam cakes contain little or no fat and dry out quickly; store at room temperature for up to two days.

To freeze butter cakes, place them, unwrapped, in the freezer until firm; wrap in plastic and then in heavy-duty foil. Frosted cakes can be frozen for up to two months; unfrosted cakes for up to six months. Do not freeze cakes with whipped-cream frostings or egg-based fillings. Foam cakes can be frozen in heavy-duty zip-tight plastic bags for up to three months.

BUTTER CAKES

These cakes rely on fat for moistness and richness. The fat must be beaten well with the sugar to provide an aerated base. Beat the butter-and-sugar mixture with an electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy, scraping down the side of the bowl as directed. Beat in the eggs, one a time, beating well after each addition.

Pour the batter into the prepared pans and gently tap the pans on a counter to break any large air bubbles. The cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Some cakes also pull away slightly from the side of the pan. Or lightly press the center of the cake with your finger; the top should spring back.

Cool the cake on a wire rack for ten minutes. Run a knife around the inside of the pan. Invert a second rack on top of the pan. Invert both racks along with the pan. Remove the top rack and the cake pan. Replace the top rack and invert the cake again, so it is right side up.