Cookies & Confections

Cookies & Confections

87 out of 100 based on 25489 user ratings
45 juta s/d 2.5 milyar listing 2017
Cookies & Confections Cookies & Confections Cookies & Confections, Cookies are one of the simplest and most delicious treats you can make. Here is our collection of favorite recipes and tips to help guarantee your baking success.
Cookies & Confections

Cookies & Confections

Cookies are one of the simplest and most delicious treats you can make. Here is our collection of favorite recipes and tips to help guarantee your baking success.

TYPES OF COOKIES

  • Bar cookies couldn’t be easier. Mix up some dough, spread it in a pan, then bake, cool, and cut.
  • Drop cookies are made by dropping spoonfuls of soft dough onto cookie sheets.
  • Molded cookies are made from a stiff dough that is formed into balls, logs, pretzels, or other shapes or baked in individual molds.
  • Pressed cookies are made from a stiff dough that is squeezed through a cookie press or pastry bag.
  • Refrigerator cookies (also called icebox cookies) begin with a chilled stiff dough that is sliced and baked.
  • Rolled cookies are made from a stiff dough that is rolled out into a thin layer, then cut into shapes.

COOKIE SHEET SAVVY

Good-quality cookie sheets are one of the secrets to perfect cookies. Heavy-gauge metal cookie sheets that have a dull finish turn out the most evenly browned cookies; aluminum is ideal. Double-thick insulated cookie sheets discourage overbaking and are a good investment. Dark cookie sheets can overbrown the bottoms of cookies. If your cookie sheets are old and discolored, line them with foil. Better still, purchase new ones. The air in your oven should circulate freely around the cookie sheets, which should be at least 2 inches smaller in length and width than your oven. Cookie sheets should be rimless (or have only one or two turned-up edges) for the best air circulation. Grease cookie sheets only when a recipe directs you to. Some cookies have a high fat content, so greasing isn’t necessary. Vegetable shortening is better than butter for greasing cookie sheets because butter sometimes browns as it melts in the oven. Nonstick cookie sheets and silcone nonstick baking liners are good alternatives to greasing and flouring. For an even coat when greasing is required, use a crumpled piece of paper towel. To flour a cookie sheet, sprinkle the greased sheet evenly with a little flour, then tap off the excess. For easy cleanup, line cookie sheets with foil (dull side up). Never place cookie dough on a hot cookie sheet; a hot cookie sheet will melt the dough before it has a chance to set. Always let cookie sheets cool between batches. If the recipe calls for greased sheets, regrease for each batch.

BAKING SUCCESS

  • While butter and margarine are interchangeable in some cookie recipes, for the best flavor and texture, use butter.
  • If you prefer margarine, make sure it contains 80 percent fat. Spreads (diet, whipped, liquid, or soft) have a high water content, which produces tough cookies that lack flavor.
  • For the tenderest cookies, once the flour has been added, mix the dough just until blended.
  • Use a measuring spoon to scoop up equal portions of dough to make consistently shaped cookies that will bake in the same amount of time.
  • For drop cookies, place spoonfuls of dough 2 inches apart unless the recipe directs otherwise.
  • Dust the work surface lightly and evenly with flour before rolling out dough. Rub the rolling pin well with flour to keep it from sticking to the dough, or lightly dust the top of the dough with flour.
  • When rolling out chilled dough, roll out one portion at a time; keep the remaining dough covered in the refrigerator.
  • If a chilled dough cracks when rolled, let it stand at room temperature to soften slightly, then try again.
  • For evenly baked cookies, bake one sheet of cookies at a time in the center of the oven. If you want to bake two sheets at a time, position the racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Then, halfway through baking, rotate the cookie sheets between the upper and lower oven racks (unless directed otherwise) and also rotate them front to back.
  • Bake cookies for the minimum suggested baking time, then check for doneness. If not done, watch them carefully for the remainder of the time to avoid overbaking.
  • Unless a recipe directs otherwise, cool cookies briefly on the cookie sheet to firm slightly, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely; hot cookies are too soft to be moved immediately to racks. Cool bar cookies completely in the pan before cutting.

STORING COOKIES

Store soft and crisp cookies in separate containers with tight-fitting covers. Crisp cookies that soften can be recrisped in a 300°F oven for three to five minutes. Soft cookies can be kept soft by adding a piece of apple or bread to the container; change it every other day or so. (This technique also works for soft cookies that have hardened.) Store bar cookies in the pan they were baked in, tightly covered with foil or plastic wrap. To freeze baked cookies, cool them thoroughly. Place them in airtight containers, cushioned with crumpled waxed paper, if necessary. If the cookies have been decorated, freeze them until hard in a single layer on a cookie sheet, then pack for storage, separating the layers with waxed paper. To thaw, unwrap the cookies and let stand for about ten minutes at room temperature. To freeze unbaked cookie dough, wrap tightly in heavy-duty foil and store in a container. For refrigerator cookies, wrap the logs of dough in heavy-duty foil. Freeze for up to six months; thaw in the refrigerator. Remember to label and date each package.

CHOCOLATE AND COCOA

Because of its unique flavor and smooth texture, chocolate is an essential component in all kinds of sweets, including candies. There are many different kinds of chocolates, and they are rarely interchangeable. See Chocolate and Cocoa Powder. Chocolate has two enemies: water and high heat. If a single drop of water gets into chocolate while it’s melting, the chocolate can “seize” (form a dull, thick paste). Chocolate melted over heat that is too high clumps and becomes grainy, so melt it over low heat. To chop chocolate, use a sharp, heavy knife and a dry, clean cutting board. Chop into 1/4-inch pieces. To melt chocolate, place the chopped chocolate in a heavy-bottomed saucepan; stir frequently over low heat until melted, watching carefully to avoid scorching. Or place the chocolate in the top of a double boiler over very hot, not simmering, water and stir until melted. Or place it in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave at 50 percent power, stirring at intervals. Store chocolate and cocoa powder in a cool, dry place. “Blooms,” or pale streaks that may appear, will not affect the chocolate’s performance or taste. baking success, cake dessert recipes, chocolate and cocoa, confections recipe, cookie sheet savvy, cookies recipe, oatmeal peanut butter cookies, peanut butter oatmeal cookies, storing cookies, types of cookies, recipes, snack recipes, drink recipes, cake recipes, condiment, nutrition, tips and tricks, asian recipes, american recipes, european recipes, african recipes, australie recipes, Indonesian recipes
Thursday, 23 November 2017

Cookies & Confections

Article Categories : Cookies & Confections

Cookies & Confections

Cookies & Confections

Cookies are one of the simplest and most delicious treats you can make. Here is our collection of favorite recipes and tips to help guarantee your baking success.

TYPES OF COOKIES

  • Bar cookies couldn’t be easier. Mix up some dough, spread it in a pan, then bake, cool, and cut.
  • Drop cookies are made by dropping spoonfuls of soft dough onto cookie sheets.
  • Molded cookies are made from a stiff dough that is formed into balls, logs, pretzels, or other shapes or baked in individual molds.
  • Pressed cookies are made from a stiff dough that is squeezed through a cookie press or pastry bag.
  • Refrigerator cookies (also called icebox cookies) begin with a chilled stiff dough that is sliced and baked.
  • Rolled cookies are made from a stiff dough that is rolled out into a thin layer, then cut into shapes.

COOKIE SHEET SAVVY

Good-quality cookie sheets are one of the secrets to perfect cookies. Heavy-gauge metal cookie sheets that have a dull finish turn out the most evenly browned cookies; aluminum is ideal. Double-thick insulated cookie sheets discourage overbaking and are a good investment. Dark cookie sheets can overbrown the bottoms of cookies. If your cookie sheets are old and discolored, line them with foil. Better still, purchase new ones.

The air in your oven should circulate freely around the cookie sheets, which should be at least 2 inches smaller in length and width than your oven. Cookie sheets should be rimless (or have only one or two turned-up edges) for the best air circulation.

Grease cookie sheets only when a recipe directs you to. Some cookies have a high fat content, so greasing isn’t necessary. Vegetable shortening is better than butter for greasing cookie sheets because butter sometimes browns as it melts in the oven. Nonstick cookie sheets and silcone nonstick baking liners are good alternatives to greasing and flouring.

For an even coat when greasing is required, use a crumpled piece of paper towel. To flour a cookie sheet, sprinkle the greased sheet evenly with a little flour, then tap off the excess. For easy cleanup, line cookie sheets with foil (dull side up).

Never place cookie dough on a hot cookie sheet; a hot cookie sheet will melt the dough before it has a chance to set. Always let cookie sheets cool between batches. If the recipe calls for greased sheets, regrease for each batch.

BAKING SUCCESS

  • While butter and margarine are interchangeable in some cookie recipes, for the best flavor and texture, use butter.
  • If you prefer margarine, make sure it contains 80 percent fat. Spreads (diet, whipped, liquid, or soft) have a high water content, which produces tough cookies that lack flavor.
  • For the tenderest cookies, once the flour has been added, mix the dough just until blended.
  • Use a measuring spoon to scoop up equal portions of dough to make consistently shaped cookies that will bake in the same amount of time.
  • For drop cookies, place spoonfuls of dough 2 inches apart unless the recipe directs otherwise.
  • Dust the work surface lightly and evenly with flour before rolling out dough. Rub the rolling pin well with flour to keep it from sticking to the dough, or lightly dust the top of the dough with flour.
  • When rolling out chilled dough, roll out one portion at a time; keep the remaining dough covered in the refrigerator.
  • If a chilled dough cracks when rolled, let it stand at room temperature to soften slightly, then try again.
  • For evenly baked cookies, bake one sheet of cookies at a time in the center of the oven. If you want to bake two sheets at a time, position the racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Then, halfway through baking, rotate the cookie sheets between the upper and lower oven racks (unless directed otherwise) and also rotate them front to back.
  • Bake cookies for the minimum suggested baking time, then check for doneness. If not done, watch them carefully for the remainder of the time to avoid overbaking.
  • Unless a recipe directs otherwise, cool cookies briefly on the cookie sheet to firm slightly, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely; hot cookies are too soft to be moved immediately to racks. Cool bar cookies completely in the pan before cutting.

STORING COOKIES

Store soft and crisp cookies in separate containers with tight-fitting covers. Crisp cookies that soften can be recrisped in a 300°F oven for three to five minutes. Soft cookies can be kept soft by adding a piece of apple or bread to the container; change it every other day or so. (This technique also works for soft cookies that have hardened.) Store bar cookies in the pan they were baked in, tightly covered with foil or plastic wrap.

To freeze baked cookies, cool them thoroughly. Place them in airtight containers, cushioned with crumpled waxed paper, if necessary. If the cookies have been decorated, freeze them until hard in a single layer on a cookie sheet, then pack for storage, separating the layers with waxed paper. To thaw, unwrap the cookies and let stand for about ten minutes at room temperature.

To freeze unbaked cookie dough, wrap tightly in heavy-duty foil and store in a container. For refrigerator cookies, wrap the logs of dough in heavy-duty foil. Freeze for up to six months; thaw in the refrigerator. Remember to label and date each package.

CHOCOLATE AND COCOA

Because of its unique flavor and smooth texture, chocolate is an essential component in all kinds of sweets, including candies. There are many different kinds of chocolates, and they are rarely interchangeable. See Chocolate and Cocoa Powder.

Chocolate has two enemies: water and high heat. If a single drop of water gets into chocolate while it’s melting, the chocolate can “seize” (form a dull, thick paste). Chocolate melted over heat that is too high clumps and becomes grainy, so melt it over low heat.

To chop chocolate, use a sharp, heavy knife and a dry, clean cutting board. Chop into 1/4-inch pieces.

To melt chocolate, place the chopped chocolate in a heavy-bottomed saucepan; stir frequently over low heat until melted, watching carefully to avoid scorching. Or place the chocolate in the top of a double boiler over very hot, not simmering, water and stir until melted. Or place it in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave at 50 percent power, stirring at intervals.

Store chocolate and cocoa powder in a cool, dry place. “Blooms,” or pale streaks that may appear, will not affect the chocolate’s performance or taste.