Desserts

Desserts

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Desserts Desserts Desserts, Our collection of scrumptious desserts is sure to tempt you: soufflés, meringues, custards, puff pastry desserts, pudding cakes, and other earthly delights. Many of the desserts rely on eggs for their distinctive textures, so here are some tips to help you with some basic techniques.
Desserts

Desserts

Our collection of scrumptious desserts is sure to tempt you: soufflés, meringues, custards, puff pastry desserts, pudding cakes, and other earthly delights. Many of the desserts rely on eggs for their distinctive textures, so here are some tips to help you with some basic techniques.

CUSTARDS

Custard, a cooked milk or cream mixture thickened with eggs and sweetened with sugar, can be baked for a dessert or cooked on top of the stove for a silky dessert sauce (called a stirred custard). A moderate cooking temperature is necessary for baked custards, so they are cooked in a water bath (a roasting pan filled with hot water to come halfway up the sides of the cups), which insulates them from the oven’s heat. For stirred custards, the yolks are gradually heated. A small amount of the hot liquid is stirred into the yolks, then the yolk mixture is stirred back into the hot liquid. This prevents the custard from curdling. The center of a properly cooked custard will jiggle, as it will continue to cook as it cools. Insert the tip of a knife into the custard about 1 inch from the center; it should come out clean. Custard sauces must be stirred constantly over low heat to prevent scorching and overcooking. The custard is cooked until thick enough to coat a spoon. Strain the custard into a bowl, then press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface.

HIGH-RISING SOUFFLÉS

The secret to a beautifully risen soufflé isn’t really that secret. It’s all about perfectly beaten eggs whites. Separate the eggs while cold, then let them sit at room temperature until warm, so they will beat to their highest volume. Beat the egg whites just until stiff—not dry. Fold about one-third of the whites into the batter to lighten it, then fold in the remaining whites. Because soufflés need a blast of hot air to rise properly, be sure the oven is preheated thoroughly. A soufflé is done when puffed and golden brown, with a somewhat soft, barely set center. Once exposed to the air, a soufflé will keep its puff for only three to five minutes.

MAGICAL MERINGUES

Meringues are nothing more complicated than a beaten mixture of egg whites and sugar. There are two types of meringue, soft and hard, which simply depend on the proportion of sugar to egg whites. Soft meringue contains less sugar while hard meringue contains more sugar. Never make meringue on a humid or rainy day, because it will absorb the moisture from the air and end up soggy or “weep.” Beat room-temperature egg whites at high speed until soft peaks form. Then add the sugar, two tablespoons at a time, beating just until stiff, glossy peaks form. Check that the sugar has dissolved by rubbing a bit of the meringue between your fingers. cake recipes, dessert ideas, dessert recipes, desserts, desserts recipes, easy cake recipes, easy dessert recipes, easy desserts, recipes for desserts, recipes, snack recipes, drink recipes, cake recipes, condiment, nutrition, tips and tricks, asian recipes, american recipes, european recipes, african recipes, australie recipes, Indonesian recipes
Saturday, 18 November 2017

Desserts

Article Categories : Desserts

Desserts

Desserts

Our collection of scrumptious desserts is sure to tempt you: soufflés, meringues, custards, puff pastry desserts, pudding cakes, and other earthly delights. Many of the desserts rely on eggs for their distinctive textures, so here are some tips to help you with some basic techniques.

CUSTARDS

Custard, a cooked milk or cream mixture thickened with eggs and sweetened with sugar, can be baked for a dessert or cooked on top of the stove for a silky dessert sauce (called a stirred custard).

A moderate cooking temperature is necessary for baked custards, so they are cooked in a water bath (a roasting pan filled with hot water to come halfway up the sides of the cups), which insulates them from the oven’s heat. For stirred custards, the yolks are gradually heated. A small amount of the hot liquid is stirred into the yolks, then the yolk mixture is stirred back into the hot liquid. This prevents the custard from curdling.

The center of a properly cooked custard will jiggle, as it will continue to cook as it cools. Insert the tip of a knife into the custard about 1 inch from the center; it should come out clean. Custard sauces must be stirred constantly over low heat to prevent scorching and overcooking. The custard is cooked until thick enough to coat a spoon. Strain the custard into a bowl, then press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the surface.

HIGH-RISING SOUFFLÉS

The secret to a beautifully risen soufflé isn’t really that secret. It’s all about perfectly beaten eggs whites. Separate the eggs while cold, then let them sit at room temperature until warm, so they will beat to their highest volume.

Beat the egg whites just until stiff—not dry. Fold about one-third of the whites into the batter to lighten it, then fold in the remaining whites.

Because soufflés need a blast of hot air to rise properly, be sure the oven is preheated thoroughly. A soufflé is done when puffed and golden brown, with a somewhat soft, barely set center. Once exposed to the air, a soufflé will keep its puff for only three to five minutes.

MAGICAL MERINGUES

Meringues are nothing more complicated than a beaten mixture of egg whites and sugar. There are two types of meringue, soft and hard, which simply depend on the proportion of sugar to egg whites. Soft meringue contains less sugar while hard meringue contains more sugar.

Never make meringue on a humid or rainy day, because it will absorb the moisture from the air and end up soggy or “weep.” Beat room-temperature egg whites at high speed until soft peaks form. Then add the sugar, two tablespoons at a time, beating just until stiff, glossy peaks form. Check that the sugar has dissolved by rubbing a bit of the meringue between your fingers.