Pies & Tarts

Pies & Tarts

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Pies & Tarts Pies & Tarts Pies & Tarts, Whether a pie is bursting with seasonal fruit, filled with creamy custard, or crowned with meringue, you can always count on one thing: It will be delicious. Of course, a tender, flaky crust is one of the most important elements. There’s no mystery to making a fine crust: Just follow our easy mixing and rolling techniques, and you’ll find that it’s as . . . easy as pie.
Pies & Tarts

Pies & Tarts

Whether a pie is bursting with seasonal fruit, filled with creamy custard, or crowned with meringue, you can always count on one thing: It will be delicious. Of course, a tender, flaky crust is one of the most important elements. There’s no mystery to making a fine crust: Just follow our easy mixing and rolling techniques, and you’ll find that it’s as . . . easy as pie.

INGREDIENTS

The flavor and texture of a baked piecrust depend on two main ingredients: flour and fat. For the tenderest crust, use all-purpose flour. The single most important factor in the quest for tender pastry is the fat. Butter gives a dough rich flavor, crispness, and color; vegetable shortening makes it flaky. We use butter and shortening to give piecrust the best qualities of each. To keep the fat in the dough chilled and firm, use ice water to bring the ingredients together. And be sure both the butter and shortening are well chilled. The pieces of fat should hold their shape. The kitchen should be cool, too. If you must make pie on a hot day, chill the flour.

MIXING THE DOUGH

  • A pastry blender is the best utensil for blending fat and flour. But you can also use two dinner knives, scissor-fashion, to cut in the fat until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Using a fork to toss, combine the mixture, then sprinkle in the water, 1 tablespoon at a time, mixing lightly after each addition, just until the dough is moist enough to hold together.
  • Shape the dough into one or more disks, depending on the recipe. Wrap each disk in waxed paper or plastic wrap and chill for at least 30 minutes or up to overnight. If it’s been chilled overnight, allow the dough to stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes to soften it slightly or it will crack when rolled out.

ROLLING OUT THE DOUGH

To prevent sticking, dust the work surface lightly with flour. Rub the rolling pin with flour, too. If you wish, sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough. Start in the center and roll out the dough, rolling up to—but not over—the edge. Give the dough a quarter turn. Repeat until you have an even round. If the dough tears, just moisten the edges and press them together.

THE PERFECT FIT

Use a glass pie plate or a dull metal one. We use a standard 9-inch pie plate for most of our pies. Some fruit pies call for a deep-dish pie plate (9 inches wide by 11/2 to 2 inches deep). For tarts, use a fluted pan with a removable bottom. There are two ways to transfer rolled-out dough to a pie plate or tart pan: Loosely roll the dough onto the rolling pin, position the pin at one side of the pie plate, and unroll the dough. Alternatively, fold the rolled-out dough into quarters, set it into the pie plate, and unfold. Fit the dough into the pie plate by gently easing it onto the bottom and against the sides with your fingertips. Never stretch the dough to fit, or the crust may shrink during baking. To help reduce shrinkage in single-crust pies, chill the piecrust for 10 to 15 minutes before baking.

DECORATIVE PIE EDGES

These borders are the perfect way to add a professional finish to homemade pies. Forked Edge Trim the dough edge even with the rim of the pie plate. With floured fork tines, press patterns into the dough edge at even intervals. Fluted Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. Place the thumb and forefinger of one hand, 1/2 inch apart, on the outside of the pastry edge; pinch the dough into a V shape. With the forefinger of your other hand on the inner side of the pastry edge, push the dough to define the shape. Repeat. Turret Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. With a knife, cut the dough at ½-inch intervals. Fold the dough pieces down, alternating toward and away from the rim. Appliqué Edge Prepare Pastry Dough for 2-Crust Pie (opposite). Roll out the dough for the bottom crust and place in the pie plate as directed; trim the edge even with the rim of the plate. Roll out the remaining disk of dough 1/inch thick. With a floured small knife or small cookie cutter, cut out small leaves or hearts. Lightly brush the dough edge with water. Gently press the shapes, slightly overlapping them, onto the dough edge to adhere. Crimped Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. Push one index finger against the inside edge of the rim; with the index finger and thumb of the other hand, pinch dough to flute. Repeat all around the edge, leaving 1/inch between each flute.

PIE TOPS

Prepare Pastry Dough for 2-Crust Pie (right). Roll out the dough for the bottom crust and place in the pie plate as directed; fill. Roll out the remaining disk into a 12-inch round; proceed as directed below. Window Center the dough round over the filling. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Form a stand-up edge and make a decorative edge (left). Cut a 4-inch X in the center of the top crust; gently fold back the points to make a square opening. Lattice With a pastry wheel or small knife, cut the dough round into 1/2-inch-wide strips. Moisten the edge of the bottom crust with water. Evenly space half of the pastry strips across the top of the pie; press at both ends to seal. Place an equal number of strips on top at a right angle. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang, then moisten and press the strips. Turn the overhang over the ends of the strips. Form a high stand-up edge and make a decorative edge. Appliqué Center the dough round over the filling. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Form a stand-up edge and make a decorative edge (left). Roll out the trimmings. Use a small knife dipped in flour to cut free-form shapes. Brush the undersides of the dough shapes with water; place, moistened-side down, on top of the pie.

BAKING IT RIGHT

To catch any overflow, bake the pie on a sheet of foil with the edges crimped, or place on a foil-lined cookie sheet. Bake the pie in the lower third of the oven so the bottom crust crisps and the top doesn’t overbrown (if the top is browning too fast, cover it loosely with foil, opposite). Before serving, always cool fruit pies on a wire rack so the filling can set.

STORING PIES

Fruit pies can be covered and stored overnight at room temperature. For longer storage, refrigerate. Meringue pies are best the day they are made. Pies with cream or custard fillings should be refrigerated as soon as they are cool. Refrigerate leftovers. apple tart, apple tart recipe, butter tarts, chocolate tart, egg tart recipe, lemon tart, lemon tart recipe, pear tart, pies & tarts, pop tart, recipes for pies, tart recipe, tart recipes, tartlet recipes, tarts, tarts recipe, tarts recipes, recipes, snack recipes, drink recipes, cake recipes, condiment, nutrition, tips and tricks, asian recipes, american recipes, european recipes, african recipes, australie recipes, Indonesian recipes
Saturday, 18 November 2017

Pies & Tarts

Article Categories : Pies & Tarts

Pies & Tarts

Pies & Tarts

Whether a pie is bursting with seasonal fruit, filled with creamy custard, or crowned with meringue, you can always count on one thing: It will be delicious. Of course, a tender, flaky crust is one of the most important elements. There’s no mystery to making a fine crust: Just follow our easy mixing and rolling techniques, and you’ll find that it’s as . . . easy as pie.

INGREDIENTS

The flavor and texture of a baked piecrust depend on two main ingredients: flour and fat. For the tenderest crust, use all-purpose flour.

The single most important factor in the quest for tender pastry is the fat. Butter gives a dough rich flavor, crispness, and color; vegetable shortening makes it flaky. We use butter and shortening to give piecrust the best qualities of each. To keep the fat in the dough chilled and firm, use ice water to bring the ingredients together. And be sure both the butter and shortening are well chilled. The pieces of fat should hold their shape. The kitchen should be cool, too. If you must make pie on a hot day, chill the flour.

MIXING THE DOUGH

  • A pastry blender is the best utensil for blending fat and flour. But you can also use two dinner knives, scissor-fashion, to cut in the fat until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Using a fork to toss, combine the mixture, then sprinkle in the water, 1 tablespoon at a time, mixing lightly after each addition, just until the dough is moist enough to hold together.
  • Shape the dough into one or more disks, depending on the recipe. Wrap each disk in waxed paper or plastic wrap and chill for at least 30 minutes or up to overnight. If it’s been chilled overnight, allow the dough to stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes to soften it slightly or it will crack when rolled out.

ROLLING OUT THE DOUGH

To prevent sticking, dust the work surface lightly with flour. Rub the rolling pin with flour, too. If you wish, sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough. Start in the center and roll out the dough, rolling up to—but not over—the edge. Give the dough a quarter turn. Repeat until you have an even round. If the dough tears, just moisten the edges and press them together.

THE PERFECT FIT

Use a glass pie plate or a dull metal one. We use a standard 9-inch pie plate for most of our pies. Some fruit pies call for a deep-dish pie plate (9 inches wide by 11/2 to 2 inches deep). For tarts, use a fluted pan with a removable bottom.

There are two ways to transfer rolled-out dough to a pie plate or tart pan: Loosely roll the dough onto the rolling pin, position the pin at one side of the pie plate, and unroll the dough. Alternatively, fold the rolled-out dough into quarters, set it into the pie plate, and unfold.

Fit the dough into the pie plate by gently easing it onto the bottom and against the sides with your fingertips. Never stretch the dough to fit, or the crust may shrink during baking. To help reduce shrinkage in single-crust pies, chill the piecrust for 10 to 15 minutes before baking.

DECORATIVE PIE EDGES

These borders are the perfect way to add a professional finish to homemade pies.

Forked Edge Trim the dough edge even with the rim of the pie plate. With floured fork tines, press patterns into the dough edge at even intervals.

Fluted Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. Place the thumb and forefinger of one hand, 1/2 inch apart, on the outside of the pastry edge; pinch the dough into a V shape. With the forefinger of your other hand on the inner side of the pastry edge, push the dough to define the shape. Repeat.

Turret Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. With a knife, cut the dough at ½-inch intervals. Fold the dough pieces down, alternating toward and away from the rim.

Appliqué Edge Prepare Pastry Dough for 2-Crust Pie (opposite). Roll out the dough for the bottom crust and place in the pie plate as directed; trim the edge even with the rim of the plate. Roll out the remaining disk of dough 1/inch thick. With a floured small knife or small cookie cutter, cut out small leaves or hearts. Lightly brush the dough edge with water. Gently press the shapes, slightly overlapping them, onto the dough edge to adhere.

Crimped Edge Trim the dough edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under; form a stand-up edge. Push one index finger against the inside edge of the rim; with the index finger and thumb of the other hand, pinch dough to flute. Repeat all around the edge, leaving 1/inch between each flute.

PIE TOPS

Prepare Pastry Dough for 2-Crust Pie (right). Roll out the dough for the bottom crust and place in the pie plate as directed; fill. Roll out the remaining disk into a 12-inch round; proceed as directed below.

Window Center the dough round over the filling. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Form a stand-up edge and make a decorative edge (left). Cut a 4-inch X in the center of the top crust; gently fold back the points to make a square opening.

Lattice With a pastry wheel or small knife, cut the dough round into 1/2-inch-wide strips. Moisten the edge of the bottom crust with water. Evenly space half of the pastry strips across the top of the pie; press at both ends to seal. Place an equal number of strips on top at a right angle. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang, then moisten and press the strips. Turn the overhang over the ends of the strips. Form a high stand-up edge and make a decorative edge.

Appliqué Center the dough round over the filling. Trim the edge, leaving a 1-inch overhang. Form a stand-up edge and make a decorative edge (left). Roll out the trimmings. Use a small knife dipped in flour to cut free-form shapes. Brush the undersides of the dough shapes with water; place, moistened-side down, on top of the pie.

BAKING IT RIGHT

To catch any overflow, bake the pie on a sheet of foil with the edges crimped, or place on a foil-lined cookie sheet. Bake the pie in the lower third of the oven so the bottom crust crisps and the top doesn’t overbrown (if the top is browning too fast, cover it loosely with foil, opposite).

Before serving, always cool fruit pies on a wire rack so the filling can set.

STORING PIES

Fruit pies can be covered and stored overnight at room temperature. For longer storage, refrigerate. Meringue pies are best the day they are made. Pies with cream or custard fillings should be refrigerated as soon as they are cool. Refrigerate leftovers.