Quick Breads

Quick Breads

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45 juta s/d 2.5 milyar listing 2017
Quick Breads Quick Breads Quick Breads As their name implies, quick breads are faster to prepare than their yeast-leavened “cousins.” Thanks to fast-acting leavening agents, these simple breads don’t require a rising period. Just mix them up and pop them into the oven. Favorite breads from this wide-ranging category include biscuits, muffins, coffee cakes, popovers, pancakes, and waffles. RISING TO THE OCCASION Most quick breads rely on chemical leavenings, such as baking powder or baking soda, to make them rise. Baking soda is an alkali that forms carbon dioxide gas bubbles when combined with an acidic ingredient, such as buttermilk, yogurt, chocolate, brown sugar, or molasses. Store baking soda in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to one year. Baking powder is a combination of baking soda and a dry acid, such as cream of tartar. Most commercial baking powders are double-acting: They start to produce gas bubbles as soon as they are moistened, then release more when heated in the oven. Baking powder can stay potent for up to six months if stored airtight in a cool, dry place. Buttermilk was originally the liquid left over from churning butter, but it is now made from milk to which bacterial cultures have been added. It is a favorite baking ingredient; its acidity balances sugar’s sweetness, and it reacts with baking soda to give baked goods a fine crumb. It’s a good ingredient to have on hand in your refrigerator. Dehydrated buttermilk powder is also available. Reconstitute it according to the package directions. In a pinch, a good substitute for buttermilk is sour cream (not reduced-fat) or plain low-fat yogurt blended with an equal amount of whole milk. You can also use soured milk: Place 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice or distilled white vinegar in a glass measuring cup, then pour in enough whole milk to equal 1 cup. Stir and let stand for five minutes to thicken. MIXING IT RIGHT Always mix quick breads with a light hand. Simply combine the dry ingredients, add the liquids, and stir. Before starting, be sure your baking powder or baking soda is active. To test soda or powder, stir 1 teaspoon into 1 cup of boiling water; it should bubble and foam vigorously. All-purpose flour makes tender quick breads. Except for recipes in which chilled butter or margarine is cut into the flour mixture, batters are easier to mix and bake better if all the ingredients are at room temperature. After adding the liquids to the flour mixture, stir just until the batter is blended. If any lumps remain, they will disappear during baking. Overmixing will cause the bread to be tough, dense, and full of tunnels. Biscuit dough is usually kneaded just a few times to blend the mixture together. Lastly, quick breads should be baked as soon as the batter is mixed, while the leavening still has its rising power. BAKING SUCCESS Bake quick breads in the center of the oven. And if baking two loaves at once, be sure there is enough space between them so the air can circulate freely. Always use the correct size pan. Loaf pans come in two standard sizes, 81/2by 41/2and 9by 5. The larger pans holds 2 cups more than the smaller one! Fill loaf pans about two-thirds full. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula so the bread bakes uniformly. Don’t be concerned if a lengthwise crack appears along the top during baking; it’s very typical. Muffin pans come in various sizes. Standard muffin-pan cups are about 21/2by 11/4, with 12 cups to the pan. There are also giant (4by 2) and mini (17.8by 3/4) muffin-pan cups. Regardless of their size, fill muffin-pan cups two-thirds to three-quarters full (to allow room for rising). Fill any empty cups with water to prevent the pan from warping during baking. To test quick breads for doneness, use the toothpick test: Insert a wooden toothpick into the center of the bread. It should come out clean without any moist crumbs clinging. If it does not, bake the bread a few minutes longer, then test again. The bread might be done even if the crack in the top looks moist. COOLING, STORING, AND REHEATING QUICK BREADS Immediately remove baked biscuits, scones, and muffins from their cookie sheets or pans to prevent them from sticking. Most fruit-filled quick breads should be cooled in their pans for ten minutes to allow them to set. Invert them onto wire racks, then turn right side up to cool completely. In general, the richer the batter (those containing eggs, butter, or fruit), the longer the baked bread will stay moist. Dense fruit breads are even better if made a day ahead so their flavors can blend. They’ll also be firmer and easier to slice. Most muffins, biscuits, scones, and corn breads are best eaten the day they are made, otherwise freeze to serve later. To Store fruit breads and muffins at room temperature, first cool them completely. Wrap them in plastic wrap and then in foil; they will keep for up to three days. To freeze fruit breads, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap and then in heavy-duty foil, pressing out the air. Freeze for up to three months. Smaller items like muffins and biscuits can be frozen for up to one month. Thaw them, still wrapped, at room temperature. Waffles can be frozen, too. Cook them until lightly browned, then cool completely on wire racks. Place them on cookie sheets and freeze until firm, then seal in heavy-duty zip-tight plastic bags and return to the freezer. To reheat, toast the frozen waffles until golden. To warm fruit breads, wrap in foil, and heat at 400°F. Muffins, scones, and biscuits will take about ten minutes, while loaves and coffee cakes will take about twenty minutes. Muffins also warm well in a microwave oven. Loosely wrap each muffin in a paper towel and microwave on High for about ten seconds. Be careful, though: If the muffins have sugary add-ins, such as chocolate chips or jam, they could get very hot, and if baked goods are reheated too long, they become tough. REMOVING MUFFINS FROM PAN Run a small metal spatula or knife around the inside of the muffin-pan cups. Turn the pan on its side and rap it on the counter to remove the muffins.
Quick Breads

Quick Breads

As their name implies, quick breads are faster to prepare than their yeast-leavened “cousins.” Thanks to fast-acting leavening agents, these simple breads don’t require a rising period. Just mix them up and pop them into the oven. Favorite breads from this wide-ranging category include biscuits, muffins, coffee cakes, popovers, pancakes, and waffles.

RISING TO THE OCCASION

Most quick breads rely on chemical leavenings, such as baking powder or baking soda, to make them rise. Baking soda is an alkali that forms carbon dioxide gas bubbles when combined with an acidic ingredient, such as buttermilk, yogurt, chocolate, brown sugar, or molasses. Store baking soda in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to one year. Baking powder is a combination of baking soda and a dry acid, such as cream of tartar. Most commercial baking powders are double-acting: They start to produce gas bubbles as soon as they are moistened, then release more when heated in the oven. Baking powder can stay potent for up to six months if stored airtight in a cool, dry place. Buttermilk was originally the liquid left over from churning butter, but it is now made from milk to which bacterial cultures have been added. It is a favorite baking ingredient; its acidity balances sugar’s sweetness, and it reacts with baking soda to give baked goods a fine crumb. It’s a good ingredient to have on hand in your refrigerator. Dehydrated buttermilk powder is also available. Reconstitute it according to the package directions. In a pinch, a good substitute for buttermilk is sour cream (not reduced-fat) or plain low-fat yogurt blended with an equal amount of whole milk. You can also use soured milk: Place 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice or distilled white vinegar in a glass measuring cup, then pour in enough whole milk to equal 1 cup. Stir and let stand for five minutes to thicken.

MIXING IT RIGHT

Always mix quick breads with a light hand. Simply combine the dry ingredients, add the liquids, and stir. Before starting, be sure your baking powder or baking soda is active. To test soda or powder, stir 1 teaspoon into 1 cup of boiling water; it should bubble and foam vigorously. All-purpose flour makes tender quick breads. Except for recipes in which chilled butter or margarine is cut into the flour mixture, batters are easier to mix and bake better if all the ingredients are at room temperature. After adding the liquids to the flour mixture, stir just until the batter is blended. If any lumps remain, they will disappear during baking. Overmixing will cause the bread to be tough, dense, and full of tunnels. Biscuit dough is usually kneaded just a few times to blend the mixture together. Lastly, quick breads should be baked as soon as the batter is mixed, while the leavening still has its rising power.

BAKING SUCCESS

Bake quick breads in the center of the oven. And if baking two loaves at once, be sure there is enough space between them so the air can circulate freely. Always use the correct size pan. Loaf pans come in two standard sizes, 81/2" by 41/2" and 9" by 5". The larger pans holds 2 cups more than the smaller one! Fill loaf pans about two-thirds full. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula so the bread bakes uniformly. Don’t be concerned if a lengthwise crack appears along the top during baking; it’s very typical. Muffin pans come in various sizes. Standard muffin-pan cups are about 21/2" by 11/4", with 12 cups to the pan. There are also giant (4" by 2") and mini (17.8" by 3/4") muffin-pan cups. Regardless of their size, fill muffin-pan cups two-thirds to three-quarters full (to allow room for rising). Fill any empty cups with water to prevent the pan from warping during baking. To test quick breads for doneness, use the toothpick test: Insert a wooden toothpick into the center of the bread. It should come out clean without any moist crumbs clinging. If it does not, bake the bread a few minutes longer, then test again. The bread might be done even if the crack in the top looks moist.

COOLING, STORING, AND REHEATING QUICK BREADS

Immediately remove baked biscuits, scones, and muffins from their cookie sheets or pans to prevent them from sticking. Most fruit-filled quick breads should be cooled in their pans for ten minutes to allow them to set. Invert them onto wire racks, then turn right side up to cool completely. In general, the richer the batter (those containing eggs, butter, or fruit), the longer the baked bread will stay moist. Dense fruit breads are even better if made a day ahead so their flavors can blend. They’ll also be firmer and easier to slice. Most muffins, biscuits, scones, and corn breads are best eaten the day they are made, otherwise freeze to serve later. To Store fruit breads and muffins at room temperature, first cool them completely. Wrap them in plastic wrap and then in foil; they will keep for up to three days. To freeze fruit breads, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap and then in heavy-duty foil, pressing out the air. Freeze for up to three months. Smaller items like muffins and biscuits can be frozen for up to one month. Thaw them, still wrapped, at room temperature. Waffles can be frozen, too. Cook them until lightly browned, then cool completely on wire racks. Place them on cookie sheets and freeze until firm, then seal in heavy-duty zip-tight plastic bags and return to the freezer. To reheat, toast the frozen waffles until golden. To warm fruit breads, wrap in foil, and heat at 400°F. Muffins, scones, and biscuits will take about ten minutes, while loaves and coffee cakes will take about twenty minutes. Muffins also warm well in a microwave oven. Loosely wrap each muffin in a paper towel and microwave on High for about ten seconds. Be careful, though: If the muffins have sugary add-ins, such as chocolate chips or jam, they could get very hot, and if baked goods are reheated too long, they become tough.

REMOVING MUFFINS FROM PAN

Run a small metal spatula or knife around the inside of the muffin-pan cups. Turn the pan on its side and rap it on the counter to remove the muffins. example of quick bread recipes, moist quick bread recipes, quick bread recipe and procedure, quick breads recipes without yeast, simple quick bread recipe, unique quick bread recipes, unusual quick bread recipes, yummy quick bread recipes, recipes, snack recipes, drink recipes, cake recipes, condiment, nutrition, tips and tricks, asian recipes, american recipes, european recipes, african recipes, australie recipes, Indonesian recipes
Thursday, 23 November 2017

Quick Breads

Article Categories : Quick Breads

Quick Breads

Quick Breads

As their name implies, quick breads are faster to prepare than their yeast-leavened “cousins.” Thanks to fast-acting leavening agents, these simple breads don’t require a rising period. Just mix them up and pop them into the oven. Favorite breads from this wide-ranging category include biscuits, muffins, coffee cakes, popovers, pancakes, and waffles.

RISING TO THE OCCASION

Most quick breads rely on chemical leavenings, such as baking powder or baking soda, to make them rise.

Baking soda is an alkali that forms carbon dioxide gas bubbles when combined with an acidic ingredient, such as buttermilk, yogurt, chocolate, brown sugar, or molasses. Store baking soda in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to one year.

Baking powder is a combination of baking soda and a dry acid, such as cream of tartar. Most commercial baking powders are double-acting: They start to produce gas bubbles as soon as they are moistened, then release more when heated in the oven. Baking powder can stay potent for up to six months if stored airtight in a cool, dry place.

Buttermilk was originally the liquid left over from churning butter, but it is now made from milk to which bacterial cultures have been added. It is a favorite baking ingredient; its acidity balances sugar’s sweetness, and it reacts with baking soda to give baked goods a fine crumb. It’s a good ingredient to have on hand in your refrigerator. Dehydrated buttermilk powder is also available. Reconstitute it according to the package directions. In a pinch, a good substitute for buttermilk is sour cream (not reduced-fat) or plain low-fat yogurt blended with an equal amount of whole milk. You can also use soured milk: Place 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice or distilled white vinegar in a glass measuring cup, then pour in enough whole milk to equal 1 cup. Stir and let stand for five minutes to thicken.

MIXING IT RIGHT

Always mix quick breads with a light hand. Simply combine the dry ingredients, add the liquids, and stir. Before starting, be sure your baking powder or baking soda is active. To test soda or powder, stir 1 teaspoon into 1 cup of boiling water; it should bubble and foam vigorously. All-purpose flour makes tender quick breads. Except for recipes in which chilled butter or margarine is cut into the flour mixture, batters are easier to mix and bake better if all the ingredients are at room temperature. After adding the liquids to the flour mixture, stir just until the batter is blended. If any lumps remain, they will disappear during baking. Overmixing will cause the bread to be tough, dense, and full of tunnels. Biscuit dough is usually kneaded just a few times to blend the mixture together. Lastly, quick breads should be baked as soon as the batter is mixed, while the leavening still has its rising power.

BAKING SUCCESS

Bake quick breads in the center of the oven. And if baking two loaves at once, be sure there is enough space between them so the air can circulate freely.

Always use the correct size pan. Loaf pans come in two standard sizes, 81/2” by 41/2” and 9″ by 5″. The larger pans holds 2 cups more than the smaller one! Fill loaf pans about two-thirds full. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula so the bread bakes uniformly. Don’t be concerned if a lengthwise crack appears along the top during baking; it’s very typical.

Muffin pans come in various sizes. Standard muffin-pan cups are about 21/2” by 11/4“, with 12 cups to the pan. There are also giant (4″ by 2″) and mini (17.8” by 3/4“) muffin-pan cups. Regardless of their size, fill muffin-pan cups two-thirds to three-quarters full (to allow room for rising). Fill any empty cups with water to prevent the pan from warping during baking.

To test quick breads for doneness, use the toothpick test: Insert a wooden toothpick into the center of the bread. It should come out clean without any moist crumbs clinging. If it does not, bake the bread a few minutes longer, then test again. The bread might be done even if the crack in the top looks moist.

COOLING, STORING, AND REHEATING QUICK BREADS

Immediately remove baked biscuits, scones, and muffins from their cookie sheets or pans to prevent them from sticking. Most fruit-filled quick breads should be cooled in their pans for ten minutes to allow them to set. Invert them onto wire racks, then turn right side up to cool completely.

In general, the richer the batter (those containing eggs, butter, or fruit), the longer the baked bread will stay moist. Dense fruit breads are even better if made a day ahead so their flavors can blend. They’ll also be firmer and easier to slice. Most muffins, biscuits, scones, and corn breads are best eaten the day they are made, otherwise freeze to serve later.

To Store fruit breads and muffins at room temperature, first cool them completely. Wrap them in plastic wrap and then in foil; they will keep for up to three days. To freeze fruit breads, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap and then in heavy-duty foil, pressing out the air. Freeze for up to three months. Smaller items like muffins and biscuits can be frozen for up to one month. Thaw them, still wrapped, at room temperature.

Waffles can be frozen, too. Cook them until lightly browned, then cool completely on wire racks. Place them on cookie sheets and freeze until firm, then seal in heavy-duty zip-tight plastic bags and return to the freezer. To reheat, toast the frozen waffles until golden.

To warm fruit breads, wrap in foil, and heat at 400°F. Muffins, scones, and biscuits will take about ten minutes, while loaves and coffee cakes will take about twenty minutes. Muffins also warm well in a microwave oven.

Loosely wrap each muffin in a paper towel and microwave on High for about ten seconds. Be careful, though: If the muffins have sugary add-ins, such as chocolate chips or jam, they could get very hot, and if baked goods are reheated too long, they become tough.

REMOVING MUFFINS FROM PAN

Run a small metal spatula or knife around the inside of the muffin-pan cups. Turn the pan on its side and rap it on the counter to remove the muffins.